Tri-Lift is Your New Forklift Headquarters

New Equipment Headquarters Graphic

Tri-Lift NC, Inc. has the new forklifts to meet near any application. From serve our customers from our convenient locations in Greensboro, Raleigh, Charlotte North Carolina and Columbia and Greenville South Carolina. Whether you need a single light-duty new forklift or a fleet of heavy-duty, high-capacity forklifts that work three shifts a day, we have the forklift you need. No other dealer in North or South Carolina provides the variety of forklifts and options to meet so many diverse applications. Our line-up includes:

  • Linde Forklifts, CLARK Forklifts, Hoist Forklifts and UniCarriers Forklifts
  • LP Forklifts, Electric Forklifts, Diesel Forklifts and Gas Forklifts
  • Forklifts in Capacities as high as 125,000lbs!
  • New light-duty forklifts and heavy-duty forlifts that are built to operate three shifts a day!
  • Electric Forklifts Built to Work Outside Under Nearly any Condition
  • Forklifts for Rigging and Machinery Moving
  • Boom Lifts and Scissor Lifts
  • Electric Pallet Jacks, Stackers, Walkie Riders and Much More

As you can see, our selection of new forklifts is second to none. We represent the finest forklift brands, with the models and options that you need. We select our brands based on historical performance, variety and reliability. And this variety and line-up has led to several awards for selling new forklifts, including Linde’s “Palmetto Award”, as well as expanded territories from CLARK and UniCarriers. Manufacturers understand that Tri-Lift NC, Inc. knows you, our customer, the industries you serve and how to work with you to get the right equipment for your operation.


Celebrating Forklift Safety Day 2016

Forklift Safety Day LogoThe Industrial Truck Association has announced it’s second annual Forklift Safety Day, to be held June Tuesday, June 14. There are things you can do to take advantage of this day to help create awareness about the dangers that forklifts present and how to minimize the potential for accidents that can result in injury or death, damage to your facility, equipment and financial losses. We’ve compiled a short list of things you can do on June 9th to improve safety on and around your forklifts.

  1. Make sure all your forklift operators have been trained and that their refresher training is up to date, if applicable or necessary.
  2. Take time to teach your forklift operators the importance of daily inspections of their forklifts. Daily inspections reduce the risk of equipment failure and catch small problems before they blossom into giant ones. You can download daily forklift inspection sheets for both IC forklifts and electric forklifts.
  3. Download and post our free forklift safety posters for:
    1. Pedestrian Notification
    2. Notice that Forklifts are in Operation
    3. That Only Trained Employees May Operate Forklifts
  4. Take some time to gather any staff that operates around forklifts, but not on them, to refresh them about the dangers of this equipment and how to be sure to use safe procedures when they are in an area of your facility where forklifts are being operated.
  5. Make sure all your forklift’s maintenance is up to date. If you have a Planned Maintenance Agreement, this would be a good time to review it with your service provider to ensure all standard checkpoints as well as unique equipment attachments are being inspected and maintained properly.
  6. Review any unique “site specific” features your facility may have and be sure your operators are aware of proper handling of equipment while on or around these features (ramps, areas where floors can be slick, floor substrates that vary etc…)
  7. Make sure that training is part of your company’s orientation for anyone that will or MIGHT operate a forklift. Remember, employees that have not been properly trained aren’t even allowed to sit on and start a forklift, much less move it out of the way of anything.
  8. Make sure you forklifts have proper safety equipment and that it’s operating properly. Lights, horns, back-up alarms, seat belts, fire extinguishers etc… Improve pedestrian safety, check out our Blue Spot Safety Light by Linde.
  9. Make sure you have lock-out kits to ensure that forklifts that do not pass an inspection are locked out immediately until repairs are made.
  10. Review all your forklifts for possible replacement. Old forklifts, or those that are getting “up there” in hours, might be potential threats. Review safety records and maintenance logs for your equipment. You might find this could be a good time to replace some or even all of your forklifts.-

Our goal is to help you operate safe, efficient and productive forklift equipment. To discuss forklift safety, operator training –or to get a quote on new equipment, please give us a call at 866-393-9833.


Introducing Baoli Forklifts by KION

Baoli 1Tri-Lift NC, Inc, as a distributor of Linde products, welcomes Kion Group’s (Linde’s parent company) the Baoli forklift line to our product line-up.

Baoli is a world-wide company with over 700 employees and sales on every continent! Kion acquired Baoli in 2009 and has begun rolling out their products to US distributors in 2016.

From it’s 1.3 million square foot plant, Baoli produces a full-line of material handling equipment from electric pallet jacks to 20,000lb diesel forkifts and has over 260 distributors in more than 80 countries!

The first product to hit our market is the KBG25/35. It comes in 5,000lb and 7,000lb capacities with pneumatic tires. The KBG features a Nissan IMPCO K25 engine, Bolzoni side shifter and suspension seat. Click here to see the remaining standard equipment and options for the KBG.

Kion is expected to continue to roll out the remainder of the Baoli line-up in 2016 and 2017. We are very excited about the opportunities that this roll out presents to our markets. Baoli is a strong product with a very competitive price that will be very competitive in the US market.


New Baoli KBG25

  • baoli-1189″ triple stage mast with hang-on sideshifter and 42″ forks
  • Scratch resistant splatter paint
  • Steering wheel with spinner knob
  • Rear handle with horn button
  • Full suspension seat
  • Swing out LP tank bracket with LP tank included
  • Solid pneumatic drive and steer tires
  • Mirrors
  • Polycarbonate rain cap
  • Strobe light and Full light package.
  • See all the specs and more pictures

$19,900 Plus Tax and Freight or

$236.81/mo.*

*60 month FMV lease with approved credit. Normal clean operation. Restrictions apply. Contact us for details at 866-393-9833.


Why One Source is So Important

Tri-Lift NC, Inc’s motto has been “One Source” for many years, and for good reason. We are a truly multi-line supplier than can assist in all facts of materials handling planning, warehouse design, installation and management of all your materials handling needs.

Few companies can assist in facility design, layout, installation and management as well as supply the right forklifts and other lift equipment to complete the job. Working with a single source means one company planning the entire project, creating specifications for all that equipment, ensuring all the pieces fit properly and function as intended.

Having one source means there is no question who is responsible for productivity. Multiple sources have the tendency to avoid responsibility by pointing to other areas not under their control. But when you work with one reliable partner, there’s one call to make, and we’re on the scene! We service and carry parts for what we sell, and even products we didn’t sell. You can count on our service team for everything from rack repair to forklift planned maintenance.

Whether you need a single forklift or a warehouse full of materials handling equipment and a hundred forklifts, Tri-Lift NC, Inc. has the resources to be the partner to help you get the job done right and maximize productivity.

Visit our website to learn more about us, then next time the need arises and make Tri-Lift NC, Inc. YOUR ” One Reliable Source!”

 


Improving Aerial Lift Safety Resources

While aerial lifts are used frequently at construction, warehousing, and many other job sites, they can pose potentially fatal hazards to workers. Aerial devices include boom-supported aerial platforms, such as cherry pickers or bucket trucks, aerial ladders and vertical towers.

The major causes of injuries and fatalities are falls, electrocutions, and collapses or tip-overs, such as the one that killed Kevin Miranda in Taunton, Mass., on Aug. 18, 2015. Skyline Contracting and Roofing Corp. was fined more than $100,000 after OSHA inspectors found that the aerial lift was positioned on unleveled ground and determined that the company had not trained Miranda to recognize this hazard.

Learn about the fall-related risks and recommended safe work practices associated with this equipment by visiting the new NIOSH Aerial Lifts webpage. The page includes a Hazard Recognition Simulator designed to help you acclimate to aerial lift operation. Additional resources on aerial lift safety are available from OSHA.

One way to improve your aerial lift safety is to be sure your operators are thoroughly trained to operate aerial lifts, based on the kind you operate and the conditions and terrain you operate them under. Visit our training page to learn more about our training programs.

Making sure your aerial lifts are operating safety is to put them on a regular maintenance schedule. It doesn’t take much to make a safe aerial lift become very unsafe. Damaged tires, hydraulic lines, worn parts etc…are all ways to increase the dangers of operating your aerial lifts. Visit our service page to learn more about our service program.s

To speak to us about your aerial lift safety and service, please contact us or give us a call at 866-393-9833.


OSHA Increasing Fines for First Time in Decades

On November 3rd it was announced that OSHA would increase penalties for the first time since 1990. The new provision is entitled the “Federal Civil Penalties Inflation Adjustment Act Improvements Act of 2015.”

This law compensates for the “freeze” on financial penalty increases that had been in place for the last 25 years. The Agreement allows OSHA to make a one-time “catch-up” increase to compensate for the more than two decades of no increases. The catch-up increase can’t exceed the inflation rate from 1990 through 2015 as measured by the Consumer Price Index (CPI), which will be about 82%.

Assuming OSHA applies the maximum catch-up increase allowed, the current maximum $70,000 fine for a Repeat and Willful violation would grow to as much as $125,000 each. The new act does include a potential exception to the increases. OSHA is allowed to forego following the  guidelines if “increasing the civil monetary penalty by the otherwise required amount will have a negative economic impact [on America]” or “the social costs of increasing the civil monetary penalty by the otherwise required amount outweigh the benefits.” This language gives OSHA considerable latitude to apply these fines as they see fit. After this one-time catch-up increase, OSHA will use inflation rate as a guide for future increases.

Employers may have several months to anticipate these higher penalties, but action on safety should begin immediately. Ensuring your forklift fleet is being properly maintained by service professionals and that all your forklift operators have current training on the equipment they operate, in the facility they operate them in, will keep you protected from these fines.

As we have discussed in previous articles forklift operator training and forklift maintenance have benefits that go beyond avoiding expensive penalties.  Workplace safety protects workers, improves morale and can actually help the bottom line profits for all workplaces. Rather than just treating safety as an expense, management should work to develop a business plan to achieve safety goals, avoid fines, and reduce insurance expense and lost time.

Visit our Forklift Operator Training page and learn more about our Planned Maintenance Program to ensure your fleet, and operators are safe and productive. Then contact us at 866-393-9833 for a quote to proving ongoing training and maintenance to ensure they both stay within safe operating parameters.


Section 179 is Back and Better for 2016

Sec179Congress has approved much needed improvements in Section 179 which allows companies, like yours, the ability to completely deduct the purchase cost of equipment the first year it is put into service. The new limits are:

Maximum 179 Deduction for 2016: $500,000

This means for qualifying equipment purchases of up to $500,000, your company can deduct 100% of the purchase price from its taxes the very first year it is put into service.

Further, this maximum will be increased annually, with the maximum tied to inflation, at $10,000 increments.

Bonus Depreciation; Maximum Qualifying Purchases: $2,000,000

Once you exceed the maximum deduction of $500,000, bonus depreciation kicks in at 50%, until you reach the maximum qualifying purchases of $2,000,000. For example, if you spend $1,000, ooo on new equipment, you can fully deduct the first $500,000, then deduct 50% of the remaining $500,000 for a total tax deduction the first year of $750,000.  It then begins to phase out dollar for dollar until you reach $2,500,000, where it is then completely eliminated.

Bonus Depreciation will be extended through 2019. Businesses of all sizes will be able to depreciate 50 percent of the cost of equipment acquired and put in service during 2015, 2016 and 2017. Then bonus depreciation will phase down to 40 percent in 2018 and 30 percent in 2019.

Note: The section 179 deduction applies to NEW and USED equipment whereas the bonus depreciation is only available for NEW equipment.

What that means to the purchase price of a NEW, $30,000 forklift? Assuming your company is in the 35% tax bracket, your effective cost, after deducting the entire $30,000 from your taxes, is only $19,500!

With Section 179 in effect for the remainder of 2015 and all of 2016, and beyond, there’s never been a better time to invest in new forklifts for your facility.

Note: We always suggest you consult your accountant or tax professional before you utilize section 179 for tax savings. Not all companies are structured the same and your savings may vary.

To learn more about Section 179, please visit; www.section179.org. Visit our New Linde Forklifts, New CLARK Forklifts, New UniCarriers Forklifts and Used inventory to see our models. Then Contact Us for a quote, or give us a call at 866-393-9833.


OSHA’s 2015 Top Ten Citations Announced

osha logoThe Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) announced the preliminary Top 10 most frequently cited workplace safety violations for fiscal year 2015. Patrick Kapust, deputy director of OSHA’s Directorate of Enforcement Programs, presented the Top 10 on the Expo floor as part of the 2015 NSC Congress & Expo, the world’s largest gathering of safety professionals.

“In injury prevention, we go where the data tell us to go,” said National Safety Council President and CEO Deborah A.P. Hersman. “The OSHA Top 10 list is a roadmap that identifies the hazards you want to avoid on the journey to safety excellence.”

The Top 10 for FY 2015* are:

  1. Fall Protection (1926.501) – 6,721
  2. Hazard Communication (1910.1200) – 5,192
  3. Scaffolding (1926.451) – 4,295
  4. Respiratory Protection (1910.134) – 3,305
  5. Lockout/Tagout (1910.147) – 3,002
  6. Powered Industrial Trucks (1910.178) – 2,760
  7. Ladders (1926.1053) – 2,489
  8. Electrical – Wiring Methods (1910.305) – 2,404
  9. Machine Guarding (1910.212) – 2,295
  10. Electrical – General Requirements (1910.303) – 1,973

As you can see, forklifts and lift equipment is high on OSHA’s lists of citations. One way to avoid citations pertaining to your forklift fleet is to ensure you’re following OSHA’s regulations regarding powered industrial trucks (lift trucks), that your fleet is being properly and regularly maintained and that your forklift operators have received adequate training, and that the training is up-to-date.

If you’re unsure of your fleet’s condition or your operator’s training status, contact us at 866-393-9833 and we will help you ensure you do not end up on OSHA’s list of citations!


Tri-Lift Receives Gold-Level Aftermarket Award from UniCarriers

Tri-Lift AEP Gold LogoTri-Lift NC, Inc. is proud to announce that we have been awarded the “Gold Level” Award for aftermarket excellence by UniCarriers Americas for 2014.

UniCarriers Americas dealerships that participate in the Aftermarket Excellence Program strive to achieve challenging performance standards across eight categories. Among them are:

  • Business Planning
  • Employee Competency
  • Customer Satisfaction.

As a result, dealerships become more successful by providing their customers with:

  • Skilled Technical Service
  • More Efficient Work Order Processing and Billing
  • Higher Overall Quality Products and Services.

UniCarriers Americas introduced its Aftermarket Excellence Program in 2014, replacing the Service Excellence Program Advertisement that was established in 1995. With AEP, program requirements are even more challenging. The program incorporates comprehensive parts metrics, giving dealers the tools to create a foundation on which to build a solid aftermarket offering and strong parts and service teams.

This award is indicative of the level of employees Tri-Lift hires, combined with the training we provide, to give our customers the very best experience every time they contact us for material handling equipment, service, rentals, parts or forklift operator training. We are all very proud to have received this recognition by UniCarriers America.

UniCarriers Service Award 2015From Left: Kim Newnam-Service Administrator, Don Caviness-Corporate Service Manager,

Kelly Jones-Corporate Service Coordinator, Candace Brown-Service Administrator


Five Things You Can do to Prevent Workplace Violence

Violence in the workplace often erupts without warning, and can have tragic results. Taking steps to prevent these situations can improve safety in your workplace, improve employee satisfaction and lead to increased productivity. Conversely, ignoring potential hazards can result in employee injury, even death — and legal action at considerable costs to the company.

OSHA has outlined five steps you can take to identify and prevent these violent encounters before they happen. While they are not directly related to materials handling operations, we feel these guidelines can apply to a wide variety of organizations, including your company.

Management Commitment and Employee Participation

As with any initiative, without the commitment of management and leadership, the rank-and-file of the organization will likely ignore any efforts to improve safety with regards to violence. Company leadership must be involved on a regular basis and visibly endorse the effort. This can be achieved by establishing a safety and health committee, and having leadership rotate in and out of meetings conducted by the committee.

Management must articulate a policy and establish goals for the company. Once a plan has been developed, leadership should allocate sufficient resources to accomplish the goals and uphold program performance expectations. Providing resources could entail meetings with health professionals to help identify potential hazards, creating visible signage and using other communication methods to keep workers involved in and aware of the program.

Worksite Analysis and Hazard Identification

There are probably facets of your operation that are prone to producing higher anxiety or tension among your employees. These could be actual physical conditions such as heat, cold, and hazardous areas as well as departments that demand high productivity, or even interaction with the public. Taking stock of these areas and identifying factors that are the least or most likely to create a stressful atmosphere are key to prevention.  Two steps you can take to identify and prevent violence include:

  • Conducting job hazard analysis – Management can conduct surveys of their departments to assess the potential risk of violence among employees. This not only includes internal assessments, but assessments of destinations to which your employees may travel, including specific neighborhoods, time of day, etc. Sites that expose your employees to violent behavior are often outside the walls of your facility.
  • Conduct employee surveys – Employees will often tell you if their jobs create stressful situations for them and if they feel endangered by some of their job tasks. Conduction of reviews on a regular basis will help you identify these areas and create a plan to reduce danger.

Hazard Prevention and Control

Once management has established and articulated its commitment, and evaluations have taken place, a plan to reduce potential hazards must be implemented.  This step includes:

  • Identification and evaluation of control options for workplace hazards
  • Selection of effective and feasible controls to eliminate or reduce hazards
  • Implementation of these controls
  • Follow up to confirm these controls are being used and maintained
  • Evaluate effectiveness and improve, expand or update these controls as needed

Safety and Health Training

As with any program you want to succeed, employees must be trained in order to follow the steps outlined by the company to identify and report these risks and follow up as needed.

This training could include meetings with mental health experts to help identify signs of stress in colleagues that could lead to violence. It also can include training on how to avoid violence outside your facility by taking common-sense actions (such as parking under a street lamp), what to do if an employee feels threatened and even self-defense training. Other training topics can include:

  • The company’s workplace policy on violence prevention
  • Documentation and reporting
  • Location, operation and coverage of safety devices such as alarms
  • Ways to identify and deal with hostile situations
  • A standard response plan for violent situations

Recordkeeping and Program Evaluation

Recordkeeping includes reporting procedures, what gets reported and to whom, and how these records are kept. Keeping track of both “close calls” and actual events helps you identify patterns, areas of particular concern and even certain job functions that might be creating undue stress on employees. It can help you identify areas outside your facility that present a danger to your employees, such as areas of town they serve.

OSHA Log of Work-Related Injuries and Illnesses (OSHA Form 300) can help you organize information not only for reporting to your proper internal sources but also for reporting to OSHA if necessary. As of January 2015, all employers must report:

  • All work-related fatalities within 8 hours
  • All work-related inpatient hospitalizations, all amputations and all losses of an eye within 24 hours

Injuries sustained as a result of assault must be entered on the log if they meet OSHA’s recording criteria (CFR Part 1904, revised 2014).

Keeping track helps you improve your program, improve employee safety and ensure your employees are operating in a safe and productive work environment.

We hope this summary is helpful to you in establishing your own workplace violence prevention plan. To learn more about what you can do, download the complete “Guidelines for Preventing Workplace Violence) by OSHA, HERE. While it was prepared for healthcare and social service workers, the overall content of this guide can assist any company, big or small, in achieving a safer work environment for all.