OSHA Business Case for Employee Health and Safety

We talk a lot about employee safety, particularly within the confines of forklifts. But OSHA has compiled plenty of information that demonstrates it is more profitable in the long-run for companies to invest in health, wellness and safety programs for their employees. Just like forklift operator safety training, investing in other aspects of your employee’s job safety and overall health, your company reaps the rewards of less sick time, improved performance and productivity, and yes, profits. Following is OSHA’s business case:

Employers that invest in workplace safety and health can expect to reduce fatalities, injuries, and illnesses. This will result in cost savings in a variety of areas, such as lowering workers’ compensation costs and medical expenses, avoiding OSHA penalties, and reducing costs to train replacement employees and conduct accident investigations. In addition, employers often find that changes made to improve workplace safety and health can result in significant improvements to their organization’s productivity and financial performance.

The following resources provide background on the economic benefits of workplace safety and health and how safety managers and others may demonstrate the value of safety and health to management.

Management Views on Investment in Workplace Safety and Health
  • Y.H. Huang, T.B. Leamon, et al. “Corporate Financial Decision-Makers’ Perceptions of Workplace Safety.” Accident Analysis and Prevention, Vol. 39, No. 4, pp. 767-775 (2007). This study reviewed how senior financial executives perceived workplace safety issues. The executives believed that money spent improving workplace safety would have significant returns. The perceived top benefits of effective workplace safety and health programs were increased productivity, reduced cost, retention, and increased satisfaction among employees.
Return on Investment in Workplace Safety and Health
  • Building a Safety Culture: Improving Safety and Health Management in the Construction Industry. Dodge Data and Analytics, CPWR, and United Rentals, (2016). Includes a section on the impact of safety practices and programs on business factors, such as budget, schedule, return on investment, and injury rates.
  • Business of Safety Committee. American Society of Safety Engineers (ASSE). This committee gathers data, prepares documents, and is a source of professional information on ASSE’s efforts to show that investment in safety, health, and the environment is a sound business strategy. This page includes links to a variety of resources on the return on safety investment.
  • The ROI of EHS: Practical Strategies to Demonstrate the Business Value of Environmental, Health, and Safety Functions (PDF). Business and Labor Reports, (2006). Reviews strategies to help EHS professionals demonstrate the value of their programs to executive management.
  • White Paper on Return on Safety Investment. American Society of Safety Engineers (ASSE), (June 2002). Concludes that there is a direct, positive correlation between investment in safety, health, and the environment and its subsequent return on investment.
  • Return on Investment. American Society of Safety Engineers (ASSE). Provides information on the return on investment in workplace safety and health.
  • Demonstrating the Business Value of Industrial Hygiene (PDF). American Industrial Hygiene Association (AIHA), (May 2008). Provides guidance on how industrial hygienists can show that they provide organizations with competitive business advantages.
  • Construction Solutions Return on Investment Calculator. CPWR – The Center for Construction Research and Training. Helps evaluate the financial impact of new equipment, materials, or work practices introduced to improve safety.
  • Safety Grant Best Practices. Ohio Bureau of Workers’ Compensation Safety Grants Intervention Program. Case studies on the effectiveness of investment in safety equipment, including reduced incident rates and return on investment information.
  • Anthony Veltri, Mark Pagell, Michael Behm, and Ajay Das. “A Data-Based Evaluation of the Relationship Between Occupational Safety and Operating Performance” (PDF) Journal of SH&E Research Vol.4, No. 1 (Spring 2007). Results of study of 19 manufacturing firms supports theory that good safety performance is related to good operating performance.
  • R. Fabius, RD Thayer, DL Konicki, et al, “The link between workforce health and safety and the health of the bottom line: tracking market performance of companies that nurture a “culture of health.” Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Vol. 55, No. 9 (2013), pp. 993-1000. Companies that build a culture of health by focusing on the well-being and safety of their workforce may yield greater value for their investors. See Abstract and Press Release.
Tools for Calculating Economic Benefits of Workplace Safety and Health
    • $afety Pays. OSHA. Interactive software that assists employers in assessing the impact of occupational injuries and illnesses on their profitability. It uses a company’s profit margin, the average costs of an injury or illness, and an indirect cost multiplier to project the amount of sales a company would need to generate to cover those costs.
    • Safety Pays in Mining. National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). Estimates the total costs of workplace injuries to a company in the mining industry and the impact of profitability.

Journal Articles

Michael Behm, Anthony Veltri, and Ilene Kleinsorge. “The Cost of Safety: Cost analysis model helps build business case for safety.” Professional Safety (April 2004). Presents a cost analysis model that can help safety, health, and environmental professionals measure, analyze, and communicate safety strategies in business terms.

“Proceedings From the Economic Evaluation of Health and Safety Interventions at the Company Level Conference.” Journal of Safety Research Vol. 36, No. 3(2005), pages 207-308. These articles describe several tools currently used by companies to evaluate the economic impact of safety and health interventions.

Susan Jervis and Terry R. Collins. “Measuring Safety’s Return on Investment.” Professional Safety (September 2001). To address the challenge of maintaining effective safety programs in the face of cutbacks, the authors discuss a decision tool to help safety managers determine which program elements offer the best return on investment.

Impact of OSHA Inspections
  • D. Levine, M. Toffel, and M. Johnson, “Randomized Government Safety Inspections Reduce Worker Injuries with No Detectable Job Loss.” Science, Vol. 336, No. 6083, pp. 907-911 (May 18, 2012). A 2012 study concluded that inspections conducted by California’s Division of Occupational Safety and Health (Cal/OSHA) reduce injuries with no job loss. The study showed a 9.4% drop in injury claims and a 26% average savings on workers’ compensation costs in the four years after a Cal/OSHA inspection compared to a similar set of uninspected workplaces. On average, inspected firms saved an estimated $355,000 in injury claims and compensation paid for lost work over that period. There was no evidence that these improvements came at the expense of employment, sales, credit rating, or firm survival. See Abstract and Press Release.
  • A.M. Haviland, R.M. Burns, W.B. Gray, T. Ruder, J. Mendeloff, “A new estimate of the impact of OSHA inspections on manufacturing injury rates, 1998-2005,” American Journal of Industrial Medicine, (May 7, 2012). Found that OSHA inspections with penalties of Pennsylvania manufacturing facilities reduced injuries by an average of 19-24% annually in the two years following the inspection. These effects were not found in workplaces with fewer than 20 or more than 250 employees or for inspections without penalties. See Abstract.
  • M. Foley, Z.J. Fan, E. Rauser, B. Silverstein, “The impact of regulatory enforcement and consultation visits on workers’ compensation incidence rates and costs, 1999-2008.” American Journal of Industrial Medicine, (June 19, 2012). Reviewed changes in workers’ compensation claims rates and costs for Washington state employers having either an inspection, with or without a citation, or an On-site Consultation Program visit. The study concluded that enforcement activities were associated with a significant drop in claims incidence rates and costs and that similar results may also be attributable to Consultation visits. See Abstract.
Making the Business Case for Process Safety Management
  • Business Case for Process Safety. American Institute of Chemical Engineers, Center for Chemical Process Safety (CCPS). CCPS developed a brochure and presentation to help companies demonstrate the business case for process safety management.
Relationship Between Injury Rates and Survival of Small Businesses
  • Theresa Holizki, Larry Nelson, and Rose McDonald. “Injury Rates as an Indicator of Business Success.” Industrial Health Vol. 44(2006), pages 166-168. Study of new small businesses that registered with the Workers’ Compensation Board of British Columbia. A statistical correlation was found between workplace safety and health and the survival of a small business. Businesses that failed within one to two years of start-up had an average injury rate of 9.71 while businesses that survived more than five years had an average injury rate of 3.89 in their first year of business.
Other Resources

Learn more about Tri-Lift NC, Inc. and our Forklift Operator Safety programs. Safety and training are the keys to productivity, efficiency and improving the bottom line. Find out why Tri-Lift NC, Inc. is your One Reliable Source for materials handling equipment, service, parts and rentals.

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Linde Targets Mainstream Forklift Market with Two New Models

1219-with-logoLinde by KION has announced it is adding two new internal combustion models to its line-up to compete with mainstream market model forklifts. The strategy is to provide the Linde quality that Linde customers expect, at mid-level pricing. By replacing the hydrostatic drive with a more conventional, but still massive differential, torque coverter type transmission, and a Ford 2.5L fuel injected engine, Linde can provide the type of quality that is synonymous with Linde products, at a lower price point.

1319-with-logo

This is exciting news as Linde forklifts traditionally have been reserved for those companies that have the highest duty cycle and harshest operations. But now, Linde forklifts will be more widely accessible for the mainstream forklift market.

The two new models are the 1219, pneumatic tire, LP and the 1319, cushion tire, LP. Both models come in 5,000, 5,500lb, 6,000lb. and 6,500lb. capacities. We are very excited about the opportunity to present these forklifts to our markets and we know that once Baltimore and Southern Pennsylvania get a look at these models and a quote from us, they’re going to be a big hit!

See the specs for the 1219 pneumatic tire forklift and the 1319 cushion tire forklift, then contact us at 866-393-9833 for a quote or more information.

Learn more about Tri-Lift NC, North Carolina and Northern South Carolina’s source for material handling equipment, service, parts, rentals and training.


OSHA Report: The Cost of Not Protecting Our Workforce

A report generated by OSHA highlights the real costs associated with on the job injuries, who pays them and how this impacts the employee and taxpayers.

Whether an employee is working on a high-rise building or driving a forklift, employers have the responsibility, and what we feel is an obligation to protect their employees from injury. By investing in training and safety, employers get fewer injuries, lower costs, more productivity and an improved satisfaction which often leads to less turn over. But all companies do not feel that way. Many are finding ways to avoid responsibility for providing safe working conditions for their most dangerous jobs.

The report highlights what some companies do to avoid responsibility and what this does to not only the employee, but his/her family and taxpayers when an accident with injury occurs. Shifting the financial burden however does not make it go away. It shifts it to over-burdened worker’s compensation and government systems. In addition, a worker who is injured can expect to make an average of 15% less income after the injury. And while the creating of OSHA in 1970 by President Nixon has greatly reduced on the job accidents, injuries and deaths dramatically, we still have approximately 4,500 deaths every year due to workplace accidents.

As a full-service forklift dealership, safety is one of our most important topics. Forklifts are dangerous pieces of equipment for the operator and anyone working around the forklift. While manufacturers work hard to innovate and make them safer, nothing can replace a well trained and cautious operator.

Report – The Cost of Not Protecting Workers

Learn More About Our Forklift Operator Training


One Reliable Source for Forklift Parts

forklift-partsWhether you have one, 20 year old internal combustion forklift, or a fleet of brand new electric forklifts, you can count on the professionals at Tri-Lift NC, Inc. to find the right part for your operational needs, regardless of the year, make or model of your forklift.

Our forklift and aerial lift parts specialists have the experience to know what questions to ask to ensure you’re getting the right part for your need, whether you know your need or not. Often times, OEM parts are required to maintain factory warranty, other times, aftermarket or remanufactured/refurbished forklift parts are just fine. We will work with you to source the parts you need, at the price you want.

And there are few companies that make the financial investment to inventory as many popular parts as Tri-Lift NC, Inc. From our branches in Greensboro, Raleigh, Charlotte, Columbia and Greenville, we source parts for thousands of companies all over North Carolina and South Carolina.

Learn more about our forklift parts capabilities, then contact your local Tri-Lift NC, Inc. facility to get a quote, or place your order. We want to be your One Reliable Source for all your materials handling equipment, service, parts and rental needs.


Celebrating Forklift Safety Day 2017

The Industrial Truck Association has announced it’s second annual Forklift Safety Day, to be held June Tuesday, June 13. There are things you can do to take advantage of this day to help create awareness about the dangers that forklifts present and how to minimize the potential for accidents that can result in injury or death, damage to your facility, equipment and financial losses. We’ve compiled a short list of things you can do on June 9th to improve safety on and around your forklifts.

  1. Make sure all your forklift operators have been trained and that their refresher training is up to date, if applicable or necessary.
  2. Take time to teach your forklift operators the importance of daily inspections of their forklifts. Daily inspections reduce the risk of equipment failure and catch small problems before they blossom into giant ones. You can download daily forklift inspection sheets for both IC forklifts and electric forklifts.
  3. Download and post our free forklift safety posters for:
    1. Pedestrian Notification
    2. Notice that Forklifts are in Operation
    3. That Only Trained Employees May Operate Forklifts
  4. Take some time to gather any staff that operates around forklifts, but not on them, to refresh them about the dangers of this equipment and how to be sure to use safe procedures when they are in an area of your facility where forklifts are being operated.
  5. Make sure all your forklift’s maintenance is up to date. If you have a Planned Maintenance Agreement, this would be a good time to review it with your service provider to ensure all standard checkpoints as well as unique equipment attachments are being inspected and maintained properly.
  6. Review any unique “site specific” features your facility may have and be sure your operators are aware of proper handling of equipment while on or around these features (ramps, areas where floors can be slick, floor substrates that vary etc…)
  7. Make sure that training is part of your company’s orientation for anyone that will or MIGHT operate a forklift. Remember, employees that have not been properly trained aren’t even allowed to sit on and start a forklift, much less move it out of the way of anything.
  8. Make sure you forklifts have proper safety equipment and that it’s operating properly. Lights, horns, back-up alarms, seat belts, fire extinguishers etc… Improve pedestrian safety, check out our Blue Spot Safety Light by Linde.
  9. Make sure you have lock-out kits to ensure that forklifts that do not pass an inspection are locked out immediately until repairs are made.
  10. Review all your forklifts for possible replacement. Old forklifts, or those that are getting “up there” in hours, might be potential threats. Review safety records and maintenance logs for your equipment. You might find this could be a good time to replace some or even all of your forklifts.-

Our goal is to help you operate safe, efficient and productive forklift equipment. To discuss forklift safety, operator training –or to get a quote on new equipment, please give us a call at 866-393-9833.


Section 179 Tax Incentives Renewed for 2017

section-179-header

Jan 1, 2017 –   Section 179 is still affected by the “Protecting Americans from Tax Hikes Act of 2015” (PATH Act) that was signed into law on 12/18/2015. This bill expanded the Section 179 deduction limit to $500,000, where it will remain for all of 2017. For those interested, you may read the summary from the Ways and Means committee here.

Section 179 Deduction: Until further notice, Section 179 will be permanent at the $500,000 level. Businesses exceeding a total of $2 million of purchases in qualifying equipment have the Section 179 deduction phase-out dollar-for-dollar and completely eliminated above $2.5 million. Additionally, the Section 179 cap will be indexed to inflation in $10,000 increments in future years.

50% Bonus Depreciation will be extended through 2019. Businesses of all sizes will be able to depreciate 50 percent of the cost of equipment acquired and put in service during 2015, 2016 and 2017. Then bonus depreciation will phase down to 40 percent in 2018 and 30 percent in 2019.

IMPORTANT THIS YEAR: Section 179 for Current 2017 Tax Year
Section 179 can provide you with significant tax relief for this 2017 tax year, but equipment and software must be financed and in place by midnight December 31, 2017. Use this 2017 Section 179 Calculator to see how much the Section 179 tax deduction can save your company.

2016 Section 179 Tax Information (Last Year)

The PATH ACT passed in December of 2015 affected 2016 and beyond, making the Section 179 deduction for 2016 $500,000. In addition, the 50% Bonus Depreciation was reinstated.
Click Here for the fully updated Section 179 Calculator for tax year 2016 (Last Year).

Answers to the Three Most Common Section 179 Questions

How Much Can I Save on My Taxes in 2017?
It depends on the amount of qualifying equipment and software that you purchase and put into use. See the handy Section 179 Calculator that’s fully updated for 2017, and includes any/all increases from any future legislation.

What Sort of Equipment Qualifies in 2017?
Most tangible business equipment qualifies. Click here for qualifying property.

When Do I Have to Do This By?
Section 179 for 2017 expires midnight, 12/31/2017. If you wish to deduct the full price of your equipment from your 2017 taxes and take advantage of the new higher deduction limits, it must be purchased and put into service by then.

Many businesses are finding Section 179 Qualified Financing to be an attractive option in 2017, especially since the expected Federal Discount Rate increases don’t leave much time for action. Please apply today.

More Section 179 Deduction Questions Answered

Welcome to Section179.Org, your definitive resource for all things Section 179. We’ve brought together a large amount of information regarding Section 179, and clearly and honestly discuss the various aspects of IRS §179 in plain language. This will allow you to make the best possible financial decisions for your company.

Section 179 can be extremely profitable to you, so it is to your benefit to learn as much as possible. To begin, you may have a lot of questions regarding Section 179 such as:

We’ll answer all of these questions, and make certain that you come away with all of the knowledge you need to make smart business decisions in this 2017 tax year regarding equipment and/or software purchasing and Section 179.

Why? Because if you’ve been thinking about buying or leasing new equipment and/or software, it’s definitely to your advantage to use this excellent tax break.

Successful businesses take advantage of legal tax incentives to help lower their operating costs. The Section 179 Deduction is a tax incentive that is easy to use, and gives businesses an incentive to invest in themselves by adding capital equipment. In short, taking advantage of the Section 179 Deduction will help your business keep more capital, while also getting needed equipment, vehicles, and software.

Free Tools that Make Calculating Section 179 Deductions Simple

Section 179 is really very simple. You buy, finance or lease qualifying equipment and/or software, and then take a full tax deduction on it this year (also, there are a few other things, which we’ll go over, but in a nutshell, that’s the idea). To give you an estimate of how much money you can save, here’s a Section 179 Deduction Calculator to make computing Section 179 deductions simple.

If you use the calculator, take note of the savings on your tax obligation. Many people find that, if they lease or finance their Section 179 qualified equipment, the tax savings actually exceed the first year’s payments on the equipment (making buying equipment profitable for the current tax year). This is perfectly legal, and a good example of the incentive that Section 179 provides small and medium businesses.

Visit our website to learn more about our line-up of new material handling equipment, including:

Tri-Lift NC, Inc. is your source for quality material handling equipment, service, parts and rentals. Visit our website to learn more. Then contact us for a quote at 866-393-9833.


CLARK Material Handling Celebrates Forklift Safety Day

The day is here and companies all around the country are taking time today to bring awareness to the dangers presented by forklifts. We’ve been promoting what you can do to celebrate Forklift Safety Day, and today, our flagship line, CLARK Material Handling is having a celebration at their Lexington, KY headquarters. Below is a summary of the festivities.

Lexington, KY (June 3, 2016) – CLARK Material Handling Company, underscoring its commitment to the safe use of forklifts and importance of operator training, is hosting a community-wide forklift safety awareness event at its Lexington campus on Tuesday, June 14, 2016, in support of the third annual National Forklift Safety Day. The program will run from 11:30AM to 1:30PM and is open to the public. CLARK is located at 700 Enterprise Drive in Lexington, KY at the intersection of New Circle Road and Old Frankfort Pike.

A full schedule of events planned to endorse and promote National Forklift Safety Day include:

  • An open house including plant tours at 11:30AM and 12:30PM
  • Special Flag Raising Ceremony at 12:00 noon, in honor of Flag Day
  • “Lift Truck Rodeo” competition and safety demonstrations
  • A display of aftermarket safety products
  • The premiere of the new CLARK video, “Forklift Safety: Pre-Shift Inspection”
  • Local media coverage including a live radio remote by 98.1 FM ‘The Bull’, WBUL
  • Free lunch – prepared by Smokin’ Jax Grill
  • Door prizes

In addition to the activities in Lexington, CLARK executives will participate in the Industrial Truck Association (ITA) National Forklift Safety Day events taking place June 14 in Washington, D.C.

“It is vitally important to emphasize the safe use of forklifts and proper operator training,” stated Dennis Lawrence, President and CEO of CLARK. “Forklift safety is not just a one day per year focus. At CLARK, forklift safety is our top priority every day. We are proud to join with the ITA and our fellow forklift manufacturers to raise awareness about the safe use of forklifts and the continual need for operator training.”

In further support of forklift safety, CLARK is offering customer discounts on select safety products purchased during June, 2016. Additionally, CLARK is conducting a lift truck operator instructor training certification course for a number of area companies.

National Forklift Safety Day, sponsored by the Industrial Truck Association, serves as a focal point for manufacturers to highlight the safe use of forklifts and the importance of operator training. This day provides an opportunity for the industry to educate customers, policymakers and the administration on forklift operating safety practices.

Tri-Lift NC, Inc. is your source for quality new forklifts, forklift service, parts, rentals and Forklift operator training. Contact us 866-393-9833 to inquire about any of our products or services.